Author Veronica Roth and Actress Shailene Woodley Talk DIVERGENT And Tris Prior

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Veronica Roth and Shailene Woodley, both sporting the stylish short-haired look, spend some time in this SugarScape interview tag-teaming the explanation of the world of Divergent and the main character, Beatrice “Tris” Prior.

Check out the interview below!

Thanks to Page To Premiere for the tip!

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Kate Winslet Admits She Had No Hesitation In Accepting Her Role In Divergent

Kate Winslet recently talked with MTV about accepting the role of Jeanine Matthews in Divergent, even admitting  she’s scored some cool points with her kids!

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“I didn’t have any hesitation at all,” she said of her role in what could be a three-part series. “It was such a great script. It’s a fantastic book.”

“My daughter is going to be 13, and my son is almost 10, and they’re getting to that age where this is the type of literature they’re going to be reading very soon,” she explained. “In fact, my daughter, two days ago, came home from school and went, ‘Mom! You’re never going to believe it. Rufus came up to me at school and said, ‘Is your mom really in ‘Divergent’? Is there going to be a premiere? Can you get me a ticket?’ ‘ My daughter suddenly [had a] new-found respect. ‘My mum is actually really cool.’ I’m just going to go with that. I did it because I wanted my kids to think I was cool.”

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New Veronica Roth Interview with ELLE

In a recent interview with ELLE, Veronica Roth talks about getting a book deal while in college, Divergent, and more!

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ELLE: You’re a bit of a wunderkind in that you got this book deal for a trilogy with Harper Collins while still in your senior year at Northwestern University. Did that change everything for you?

VR: I had applied for a graduate school program and I was wondering how I was going to get loans, and I was planning on moving back in with my parents. Then this happened, and it was like, ‘Oh, you can’t go to grad school because it’s going be a little bit too busy for a while.’ I was going for a Master’s of Arts in biblical studies; it’s sort of like a Master of Divinities but without learning Hebrew or Latin. I was, at that point, really interested in theology and scholarly inquiry about religious issues. I don’t know what I was thinking, because I landed on this path that I’m so happy with now— I mean how could I have thought that was going to be my life?

ELLE: You address religion in Divergent and Insurgent through your character Tris, who is constantly questioning her values. Where in your own experience does that come from?

VR: I think what bleeds into the writing is mostly an awareness that religious questions are essential to our growth and development. Even if you question yourself and you come to a decision that you don’t believe in anything, I think those questions are important. As far as the books go, it’s important to me not to send any kind of [religious] message—subtle or overt or anything. I don’t even want to do a moral preaching. I mean, obviously, your beliefs about the world inform your writing. It’s important to me to have Tris always asking questions—she is never really sure what she believes, but she inches towards revelations throughout the series, then sort of backs away from them.

ELLE: Is the first love relationship between Four and Tris based on your own experience? You seem to have such affection for Four.

VR: He’s definitely not based on anyone. I don’t think I would date someone with so many secrets, [laughs] so he’s not my ideal partner or anything like that. The beauty of him is that he’s a mystery, and Tris slowly discovers him. But it was important to me to have their relationship feel real, and one of the reasons why I didn’t introduce a secondary love interest or a love triangle was because I wanted to explore how relationships are challenged over time, so the best way to do that is over the course of the series.

 

Visit ELLE to read the complete interview.

Watch Movie.Com’s Interview with Shailene Woodley and Theo James at Comic-Con!

In a day full of Divergent goodness at San Diego Comic-Con, let’s start you off with Movie.com’s  interview with Shailene Woodley and Theo James where they talk about what factions they’d choose, being a part of the franchise, and more!

And be sure to visit Movies.com to read more about Perri Nemiroff’s exclusive interview!

Jai Courtney Talks Divergent, Playing Eric

In a recent interview with Australia’s  The Daily Telegraph, Jai Courtney touches on playing the antagonist and director Neil Burger.

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Courtney plays Eric, one of the film’s baddies, a merciless senior member of one of the five factions to which humans must belong in the future.

“I’ll be walking back down the more antagonistic path with the role I’m playing, which is always fun,” said Courtney, who also played a bad guy in the Tom Cruise flick Jack Reacher.

Divergent, another adaptation of a series of young adult novels (written by Veronica Roth), is currently shooting in Chicago. The movie opens in Australia on March 20, 2014.

While here last March, Courtney was pretty tight-lipped about the “fresh news” and what role he would play in the project. He did say that the director was one reason he signed on.

“Neil Burger’s done some wonderful visual stuff. He had this film Limitless that came out a couple of years ago with Bradley Cooper and I really liked what he did with that. He also directed The Illusionist, another cool film.

“I think Divergent it’s a really cool story and has potential to be something really wonderful.”

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Veronica Roth talks Badass Heroines with Leigh Bardugo

In a recent conversation moderated by Entertainment Weekly, Veronica Roth chatted with fellow author Leigh Bardugo (Shadow & Bone) about YA Lit, writing, and the importance of sexy, “competent” boys and badass heroines!

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Although they face extraordinary circumstances, Alina and Tris remain relatable as teenage girls — how much of their character makeups are based on your own experiences growing up?

L: Alina is very much an outsider and I certainly felt that way growing up. She really grapples with her desire to belong and find a place in the world, and she makes some bad choices because of it. And… now that I think about it, I was raised by my grandparents in this sort of strange neighborhood where there were pretty much no other kids. Their house was up on a hill and I was left to my own devices a lot of the time. I wonder if some of that sense of isolation crept into the description of Keramzin (the orphanage where Mal and Alina grow up).

V: That sense of isolation is a huge part of why Alina is relatable, I think — how many teenagers, and heck, even adults, feel alone in this world? I certainly did, at that age.

Tris’s experience is very much the opposite of mine. I grew up in a very free environment in which I was always encouraged to follow my natural inclinations, and I grew into a very careful, somewhat neurotic adult, for whatever reason. Tris grew up in a controlled, restrictive environment and ultimately sought freedom above all else. I think that Tris’s arc expresses some of my internal longing to escape my anxious brain. The inside of my head is a little like an Abnegation house sometimes. I don’t think Tris has much to do with my experiences growing up, though she’s certainly informed by some of the things that have formed me as a person.

Both Alina and Tris are strong, brave characters. They’re characters that girls admire. What other heroines found in literature have you admired?

L: I’m so tempted to be like, “Bertha Rochester because she burns it all down!” Most of the female characters I admire come from science fiction and fantasy, maybe because there’s more permission to shake up gender roles in genre. Alanna is a favorite, definitely Hermione. And I really adore Brienne of Tarth. She’s sometimes presented as naive or almost dogmatic in her worldview, but I love her conviction.

V: Hermione! Yes! She is a wonderful character, and I love that JK Rowling made a nerdy book-loving girl into a Gryffindor. It’s funny you should mention Bertha Rochester, Leigh, because one of my other favorites is Jane Eyre. She has some pretty strong convictions, too, and is willing to leave the man she loves in order to stand by them, which I think is amazing. More recently I’ve loved some complicated, “unlikable” characters in particular — Sam from Before I Fall, Ruby from Imaginary Girls.

To read the full interview, go to Entertainment Weekly!

Allegiant Book Cover Reveal, Plus Veronica Roth Talks About Her Thoughts On The Movie

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The folks over at Lionsgate were gracious enough to invite TheFandom.net, along with other fansites, such as Divergent Fans, That’s Normal, FangirlishHypable, Page to Premiere, Young Adult Hollywood, and I Am Divergent, to their offices in L.A. to participate in a roundtable interview with author Veronica Roth.  We got to ask Veronica about anything and everything to do with Divergent, and as you might guess, most of the questions involved were either about the Divergent movie, or the third book in the trilogy, titled Allegiant, like if she had a problem with the ages of the actors playing her young characters (no), or if the end of book three will really be the end (yes), and what scenes she’s excited to see in the movie (the answer of which you’ll have to read about below).

On the books

Was Allegiant always the title, or did you go through a few different ideas? 

Veronica Roth (VR):  I did not go through a few different ideas.  It was always going to be the title.

Were you laughing when these ideas (book titles) kept coming up? 

VR: I wasn’t laughing, because in the very early stages, I certainly thought of those words.  I remember looking up a list of the 36 words in the English language that rhymed with Divergent.  I really don’t know what to do here, because Assurgent was never going to be the word.  I wasn’t laughing, but I was laughing when they put Detergent.  I was like, yes!  It’s permeated the public conscience!

What kind of tidbits can you share from Allegiant? 

VR: What can I share? Is there anything I can share? I can’t say very much.  I think the things that you expect to learn more about, you do.  (acting coy, then laughs)  But you will find out who this Edith Prior person is and how they’re (her and Tris) are related.

So, questions will be answered (regarding the third book)?

VR: Yes! I try very hard to answer all the questions I thought that readers are likely to have, because those are the questions that I set up and those are the ones that I had when I started writing.

What does the word “allegiant” mean to you?

VR: To me, it means one who is loyal or faithful to a particular cause or person.

The second book really opened up a whole new world.  It could go so many different directions, and I was thinking that it seems like it could be really difficult to close it all off in one more book.  Would you ever continue after the third, or is that the end?

VR: I definitely mapped it out to be three books, and I think the ending is definitely an end.

Veronica Roth Clarifies Some "Free Four" Details

Will you ever write from Four’s point-of-view again, or any of the other characters’ point-of-view?

VR: I wouldn’t rule it out as far as sort of like side material, like Free Four.  What I discovered when I wrote Free Four was that it’s intensely difficult to re-write a scene from another character’s perspective because you have to keep composing the original scene to make sure that it lines up.  Then you have to keep the whole frame of the story in mind.  It was so hard that I thought I don’t know if I could ever do this as a full-length “thing.” It was fun, but it was definitely a challenge.  (open to it, yes) Open (to the idea), but I chose Tris’ narrative for a reason.

After we read Insurgent, it really turned the whole story on its head.  Can we expect that level of shock in Allegiant?  Or will it just become like answering questions? 

VR: I can’t really like anticipate how you’re going to react to it.  I think certainly some things will be shocking and some things will be like, “Ahhh!”

When you sat down to write Divergent, did you have people in mind when you were writing the characters?

VR: Not really.  I’m not one of those people who make fancasts mostly because I don’t really know actors that well.  Also, I think the images I have of characters and of the settings of the book is slightly more vague, sort of like squinting at something from afar, and I think that has helped me be more open-minded about watching the filming happen.  It’s been more magical than disappointing, because it’s like seeing someone flesh-out the details of this thing that I imagined.

On your blog, you said that what you want to write about has changed.  If you could “dreamwrite” whatever you want, what’s your dreamwriting, then?

VR: I think when I said that, I was writing the same world, the same kind of story.  But I think [Allegiant] is different in some of the things it tackles.  I mean Divergent and Insurgent are like heavy action, kind of pretty violent books.  And the third book has action, but a lot of my interest has kind of moved toward the societal struggles that are happening, and the wrestling that Tris is doing inside her head.  That was more of what I was referring to.  I love action, and I’m an action girl, but I think it’s a little more balanced now.

If you were going to place yourself in the Divergent story, which character do you think you would see yourself as? 

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No, she didn’t really wear a Hufflepuff shirt at the interview

What a question! I don’t know.  Probably one of the side people (laughs).  Like Susan.

So, are you Divergent? What faction do you see yourself a part in?

Well, that’s an interesting question.  I used to think that I would choose Dauntless.  I think that’s just a desire like a lot of people have.  “Oh yes, I want to be a badass!” I’m not!  I think I would actually choose Abnegation.  I’m a Hufflepuff [so it makes sense].

On being an author

Why do you think the dystopian future drama is so compelling right now? 

I’ve thought about that a lot.  I think it’s interesting because it sort of pulls you in both directions.  You’re interested in the forward thrust of the story and the history of the world and how it sort of became that way.  So, I think anything that will pull your mind that way will be really interesting.  Also, it would just create some really dynamic backdrop for the very human struggles and stories.

What’s your favorite part of the writing process?

I like revision a lot.  My rough drafts are just insane.  Like, word vomit mess.  Gross.  Awful.  Terrible.  And so, what I really love is kind of getting really good notes, which I’ve gotten, and totally ripping it apart and putting it back together to find the story that I originally wanted to tell.  I especially like late-stage revisions where you’re fixing little things and you start to see what it’s going to look like at the finish.  It’s really amazing.

This is going to open it up to such a new audience for people who haven’t read the books.  What does it feel like to have the last book coming out and closing the story not too far from when all these new people are starting it? 

It’s a little weird, because a lot of people are asking me about Divergent, and I’m like, “Oh man, that was so long ago!” Sometimes I don’t remember the details, but it’s incredible, obviously, to see so many people gravitating towards the books.  I kind of convinced myself that after the first burst of readership that I got, that that would be it, but it seems to be continuing its roll, and that’s amazing.  I’m glad I finished the third book before a lot of this move stuff started, so I could still imagine the characters the way I had without that changing.

On the movie

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